Adjusting HTML Element Widths: Techniques for Fixed, Fluid, and Content-Based Layouts

Colton
3 min readFeb 17, 2023
Photo by Jeffrey Leung on Unsplash

Introduction

The width of HTML elements is an important aspect of web design, as it affects the layout and appearance of a web page. In this article, we’ll discuss different techniques for adjusting the width of HTML elements, including setting fixed and fluid widths, adjusting the width based on content, and aligning elements to the right.

Setting fixed and fluid widths

One common way to adjust the width of an HTML element is to set a fixed or fluid width. A fixed width means the element will always be a specific width, while a fluid width means the element will adjust its width based on the available space.

To set a fixed width, you can use the width property in CSS. For example:

div {
width: 500px;
}

In this example, the div element will always have a width of 500 pixels, regardless of the available space.

To set a fluid width, you can use percentage values for the width property. For example:

div {
width: 50%;
}

In this example, the div element will adjust its width based on the available space, taking up 50% of the available width.

Adjusting width based on content

In some cases, you may want an HTML element to adjust its width based on its content. This is useful when you want to avoid horizontal scrolling or allow the element to expand or contract based on the content.

One way to adjust the width based on content is to use the display property in CSS. By default, most HTML elements have a display property of block, which means they take up the full width of their parent element. If you set the display property to inline-block, the element will adjust its width based on its content.

For example, to make a div element adjust its width based on its content, you can use the following CSS:

div {
display: inline-block;
}

In this example, the div element will adjust its width based on its content, and will not exceed the available width even if its content is wider than the…

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Colton

A software engineer who is always at a high level of passion with new techs and a strong willing to share with what I have learned.